I’m so Knotty

I have chronically knotted up neck/shoulders/upper back. Whenever I get a massage, the therapist usually marvels at how bad it is. I even had one masseuse tell me that I needed about 12 hours of massage with therapists tapping in and out to even begin breaking up those things. That kind of statement both makes me laugh and a little sad… because what is going on with my back?!

When I went to the Healthy Beverage Expo a while ago there was a couple of vendors there selling little portable massage devices. They were full of stories about how they are $200 devices but I could buy them at the show for the “low low price” of $59 or something like that. I left without buying, but I did kind of wish I hadn’t. They really did feel nice.

Then one day there was a Groupon deal for one of these things. So I bought it and it’s kind of addictive, the feeling of the little pulses in the muscles and it does help to relax me. Of course, after I bought the Groupon I realized the exact same Electronic Pulse Massager was on Amazon for the exact same price as the Groupon deal… except that’s the price that it is on Amazon all the time. So lesson learned, Groupon isn’t always the deal it claims, at least with the goods section!

I love the multiple settings/programs on it and how I can position the little pads to be on each side of my neck or each shoulder at the same time. But the pads also kind of suck in that they lose their stickiness way too fast. Now the only way they stay in place is if I hold them there. And it’s not very discreet.

electronic pulse masager cords

So when I was given the chance to try the new Homedics Rapid Relief pulse massagers, I was all over that. Because I may or may not be addicted to the sensation that comes from these types of things! 😉

Homedics Rapid Relief

  • Rapid Relief™ Electronic Pain Relief Pad is a wireless, completely portable Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) device, available over-the-counter, that instantly blocks the nerve pathway from transmitting pain signals from sore and aching muscles.
  • Rapid Relief takes the clinically proven technology of TENS that has been used for years by pain doctors, physical therapists and other health professionals to treat pain and makes it available without a prescription in the pain relief aisle of Walgreens, CVS and Walmart and online at Amazon.com and RapidReliefPad.com.
  • Rapid Relief works by emitting a controlled micro-electronic current, called impulses, through the skin to block the nerves from transmitting pain signals to the body’s pain center providing fast, effective relief for aches and pains.
  • Offering the latest in 21st Century pain relief, Rapid Relief uses clinically proven technology to deliver targeted, effective and safe pain relief for the lower back, arms and legs.
  • Rapid Relief is available in two models: one specifically calibrated to deliver quick relief to the lower back and another to deliver relief to arms and legs.
  • Inside every Rapid Relief Electronic Pain Relief Pad package is: one device, one standard lithium battery (CR2032), one set of self-adhesive, replaceable gels good for up to 50 treatments, and a travel storage case with instructions to optimize usage.
  • The Rapid Relief Electronic Pain Pad retails for only $29.99. Two sets of replacement Rapid Relief Gels, sold separately in the pain relief aisle, cost only $9.99.

The pads have stayed pretty sticky for several uses so far. I would like multiple program options and it is kind of a nuisance to find the up/down buttons to change the intensity when it’s on your back. Also, I have to have it on one side of my back at a time (or get multiple units and place them both there simultaneously?) but overall, this is a handy little tool.

Not just for back pain either, there is a leg/arm version. So if you’re dealing with shin spilnts, IT band pain, etc. these could be used for those typical runner trouble spots. My hubby has shin splints trouble, I guess I should try it on him…. that would also be a good test to see how it works on hairy-man-legs!

And another cool thing? It’s discreet! I can wear it on my back while in a video conference and nobody knows. Unless I have the setting up too high and start twitching.

Discreet, no wires

I was sent the Homedics Rapid Relief pads free for the purpose of review.

Disclaimer: All reviews are my own opinion, this product was provided free for the purpose of review.

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17 comments

  1. Do those things use electricity to contract your muscles? I tried one at an expo once, and I think it was kind of broken because I felt sharp tingles that almost hurt. And I left feeling tighter than before. I’m kind of scared of those now

    • Yes, it does use electricity to contract the muscles. Both are battery-operated. If the intensity level is too high, it can kind of hurt. And every user has a different threshold. I think if the person at the expo wasn’t letting the users control the levels, there’s a good chance they could have cranked it too high. Also, I think my tolerance level has gotten higher after using it for a while. So it could be the expo person was used to their levels and put it on your “virgin” muscles too high!

    • There’s a side with a clear plastic film and one with a blue plastic film. Each of those peels off to reveal a sticky side. One goes on the device and the other side goes on the skin.

  2. was doing research on the Rapid Relief that I just purchased to help w/my aches & pains, I was wondering if You might know if I could place this on the back of my neck or not, do not see anything where it shows this.

    • I wouldn’t think so, the size of them seems like they’d be awkward on the face. But I’m not the expert on it… I wouldn’t take my word as the be-all-end-all.

  3. I just got my lower back version this week. OH.MY….I have used it nearly every day. I was in some uncomfortable pain from a ‘flare up’ that I have occasionally [sciatica type nonsense]. It has been lovely. Not a total miracle cure, but does what it promises and gets you back to feeling better.

    did a search about my neck with the same apparatus and found your blog.

  4. so, I just bought a patch to try and noticed that it says if you have implants you cant use it. I have had two back surgeries so far, and I REALLY don’t want to go through this again, so I am hoping that this will help. I have my back fussed together in two places with titanium. Is this considered implants?

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